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said life in prison would ct too much. cbs 5 political reporter, ge lee is where california's dh row is located, san quentin. grace. this was a surprise outcomeo many...including the directf the field poll. mark that you should know about is that the money supposedly saved from all those legal fees and getting rid of the death penalty would be shifted to law enforcement and crime labs and the idea is to help solve murders and reported rapes. live near san quentin, grace lee, cbs 5. >>> on the campaign trail, both presidential candidates are trying to spin today's unemployment numbers in their favor. cbs reporter danielle nottingham shows us how these new numbers could impact undecided voters. >>> reporter: armed with the latest jobs numbers, president obama and republican rival mitt romney are battling it out over the economy. >> and unless we change course, we may well be looking at another recession. >> we have made real progress. but we are here today because we know we have more work to do. >> reporter: employers added 171,000 jobs in october. but with more americans looking for
. and cbs 5 reporter mike sugarman joined them on the journey. mike? >> reporter: they're cold. i'll tell you that, it's the mid 40s expected to go down into the 30s tonight and giants' fans aren'twell -- used to that kind of weather. but they're being warmed by the way their team is playing and you say they go 2,000-miles to see the team but this is a world series and they're coming from all over the world. in a sea of blue and orange -- >> tigers. >> reporter: comes a stripe of a different coalready. orange and -- color. orange and black. where am i? i feel like i'm on second and king. nope, woodward and adams, detroit, michigan. you came from south carolina? >> we drove from minneapolis last night. >> texas. >> reporter: all part of giants' nation on tour. so far, the orange and blue aren't turning the orange and black black and blue. >> i got booed four times by the time i got off the airplane but every person has been real friendly. booing me but friendly. >> reporter: making the presence known and if it's a giants' win tonight you might consider sarah stumble from santa cruz a lucky
neighborhood. damage estimates in the city are in the billions. veneta mier for cbs news, new york. >>> hurricane sandy dealt new jersey a devastating blow. hundreds are stranded and the boardwalk is in ruins. susan mcginnis has more across the delaware bay. susan, what a night. >> reporter: it's a mess. the shore of delaware has come alive again. people are out and about surveying the damage. there are lots of surfers out here today and the clean-up has begun. some 45,000 people here without power but new jersey is the hardest hit where the center of the storm came ashore. homes have moved off their foundations, this one crashed into the house next to it. the massive damage from sandy can be seen all over long beach island. homes under water boats piled up. >> the level of devastation at the jersey shore is unthinkable. >> reporter: the national guard is helping people escape the floodwaters in northern new jersey. about half a foot remained after a tidal surge left three towns under water. >> this is the worst we have seen it but we're fine. >> reporter: search-and-rescue teams a
,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the field commissioner himself. >> however this initiative to replace the death penalty with life in prison without the possibility of parole is gaining steam. >>> reporter: the crisscross shows that 45% of californians want to get rid of the death penalty by voting yes on proposition 34 while 38% want to keep tha maximum penalty. >> this is another case where if this should pass a big reason for its passage would be because of ethnic voters support. latinos and african-americans are more likely to be supporting the repeal of the
coast. now this storm is expected to slam into two others creating widespread destruction. cbs reporter randall pinkston reports. >> reporter: sandy kicked up rough waves for a para surfer off north carolina's coast as the slow moving storm threatens some 60 million people. officials are urging them to stock up on supplies and hunker down. in new jersey, residents are boarding up their homes and businesses. preparing for the storm's high winds and flooding. >> i'm feeling these -- buckets with sand and then i'm going to transfer them to the store. to make sandbags. and i'll pile them up right in front of the door. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie -- governor chris christie ordered casinos in atlantic city to close down afternoon sunday afternoon. >> we should not underestimate the impact of this storm and we shouldn't assume the predictions will be wrong. >> reporter: forecasters predict sandy could merge with winter weather systems to become a superstorm. causing massive power outages and flooding in major cities along the east coast. here in new york city, people are st
. >> cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran shows us the possible impact. there's still some undecided voters out there and these numbers, they could have some sway. >> reporter: that's because this is the last economic report we'll see before the election. today both candidates will use it for their campaign blitz to get those undecided voters. a sluggish economy has been a bone of contention. >> reporter: the president started his day in ohio with better-than-expected unemployment numbers. >> this morning we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> reporter: employers added 171,000 new jobs in october, about 45,000 more than many analysts anticipated. the labor department says hiring over the summer was better than previously thought. despite the improvement, the president is still facing high unemployment. because more americans are trying to find work, it ticked up from 7.8 to 7.9%. that's the highest number an incumbent president has faced on election day since franklin roosevelt. mitt romney says he will do a better job if he is elec
, where is the justice? cbs 5 reporter john ramos on his courtroom antics. >> reporter: in a martinez courtroom the justice system is playing itself out. but for those who have to endure it, it doesn't feel much like justice. >> we know what happens basically. he has confessed to it several times in court. we just have to go through the process. that's the endurance part that's really heart. >> reporter: he is on trial for the 2009 murder of his ex- girlfriend, deborah ann ross, and her friend, ersie everette. burris allegedly shot them both in a jealous rage at the toll plaza of the richmond/san rafael bridge where ross worked as a tolltaker but because burris is acting as his own attorney at trial the families of the victims are having insult added to their injuries. >> he is allowed to say so many outrageous and really hurtful things to the family. >> the things that he said about [ bleep ] my family and he don't give a [ bleep ] you know -- >> reporter: he said that in open court? >> yeah, he said that on tuesday. >> he said he really didn't care, they were dead, he was glad he s
million have already voted in this presidential election. live at the white house, danielle nottingham cbs 5. >>> a respected shop owner known for his generosity was shot to death in an apparent robbery attempt at his cell phone store on international boulevard near 92nd avenue. da lin shows us how friends and family are remembering a man recorded as a pillar in the community. >> reporter: the makeshift memorial outside of his store continues to grow. police say it was inside that store someone robbed and killed him and that's angered a lot of people because they say he works very hard to help the young people in this community. tears, anger and disbelief that swung killed a man to gave so much to a community that has so little. >> he was always giving the kids raider tickets. kids would come in he would give them money to feed them if they were hungry. >> it's such a sad, sad moment not because of just what's been taken from us but because of what's been taken from everyone else. my father was an amazing man. >> reporter: the police chief and the victim's family spoke out this afternoon a
>>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> just recently i started keeping track, because it was happening so often. >> i lost count. >> safeway shoppers, overcharged again. and again. and again. how the store is supposed to make it up to you. >>> and good evening. i'm ken bastida. >> i'm dana king. viewers tipped us off to what they say is on ongoing problem at safeway. one shopper says he has lost count of how many times he's been overcharged. in a story you will only see on cbs 5, julie watts goes undercover to find out how often it's happening and what safeway is doing about it. >> you know what? i didn't get it. i can show you. >> reporter: sometimes it's a misplaced price. >> so that's the wrong sign? >> reporter: other times, a computer error. but far too many times, customers complain they're getting overcharged at safeway, anywhere from 10 cents to 10 bucks. >> just recently i started keeping track, because it was happening so often. >> i lost count. >> reporter: and they're not alone. back in 2003, safeway and its southern california von's stores p
lucas film for more than $4 billion. cbs 5 reporter linda yee on why legendary filmmaker george lucas decided to sell now. >> reporter: handshakes and contract signing happened today. the $4billion deal means lucas turns over his legendary "star wars" franchise to one of the world's best known brands, disney. lucas film has its headquarters here in the san francisco presidio employing some 1200 to 1400 people in its production offices. in a company released video statement, lucas says he is selling because it's time. >> as i have gone through my career, i realized at some point i needed to retire and i wanted to go on and do other things, things in philanthropy. the final block in that was to find a good solid home for the company. and the first place i thought was disney. >> this gives disney infinite inspiration and opportunities to continue the epic "star wars" saga. fans can expect the new feature film "star wars" episode 7 in theater worldwide in 2015. >> reporter: the first feature film will come under the disney lucas film brand. the deal includes lucas' industrial light and ma
that could sing sink prop 30. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee reports. >> reporter: this fight centers around a mysterious $11 million donation that came from arizona last week. it was given to defeat prop 30. he is not happy about it and he vows to find out who is behind the money. >> they may be from anywhere. i don't know where these people are from because they're hiding. they're wearing masks. people like to run around in hoods because they don't want people to see who the hell they are. the state of california is going to court to unmask these people. >> reporter: strong words from the governor today at the naacp convention. though he later clarified that he didn't necessarily mean to refer to the ku klux klan. >> no. what it is, is, that when people do things, sometimes they don't want to be exposed for what they are doing and this arizona organization says they are in business for transparency and they are not willing to come clean in california. i think they ought to unmask themselves. >> reporter: the governor is campaigning nonstop for prop 30 which would raise sales tax .25
tomorrow. that starts at 7:30 a.m. here on cbs5. >>> new this morning a strong earthquake shook a southern island in the philippines today. it superb shored 6.9 and was centered on an island. so far no reports of any damage or injury. >>> today president obama is holding a meeting in person and by phone on recovery efforts following superstorm sandy. the governor of several states will take part along with members of the president's cabinet. the number of people killed in the northeast stands at 10, that includes 41 people in new york city alone. right now 2.7 million customers are without power across 15 states and the district of columbia. economic terms could reach $50 billion. one of the hardest hit areas is new york's staten island. good morning. >> and good morning to you. good to be with you. >> reporter: what a difference a morning makes. just in the last hour the energy in this neighborhood has been just completely transformed. you have volunteers coming in from all over the place trying to lend a hand and clean up the mess sandy left behind. here's an example a home has been turn
because a as cbs 5 consumerwatch reporter julie watts explains, a controversial flame retardant is now on the state's list of cancer-causing chemicals. >> reporter: we're used to seeing them on cigarettes and alcohol and even lead paint. but hot off the presses, prop 65 warning labels are coming to a furniture store near you. do you have any idea what chemicals are in, say this chair? >> no and neither do the people who sell it to me. >> reporter: tom georgie of georgie brothers furniture says that's the problem. the state of california has added one chemical flame retardant to its list of cancer- causing chemicals but no one seems to know which chemicals are in which sofas so they are all getting a prop 65 warning label what they do know if your couch was purchased in california, it likely contains pounds of chemical flame retardants added to comply with a 1970s state flammability standard. >> supposed to withstand the 12- second open flame. >> reporter: this scientist explains that's the 40-year-old requirement of tb-117. but it only applies to the foam inside the furniture which is
presidio, linda yee, cbs 5. >>> a day after make landfall super storm sandy still making some history. 48 people have been killed nearly 8 million customers in 15 states are without power. new york city's subway system swamped. countless homes have been destroyed by fire, wind, floods. one government prediction says the wind damage alone could top $7 billion. president obamaed heads to new jersey tomorrow to survey the damage there. sandy dealt the garden state a punishing blow. end tired neighborhoods are under water and beach boardwalks are in ruins. duarte geraldino shows us what's left. >> reporter: access to atlantic city is limited tonight because safety officials say the roads are still not safe. many of the areas are littered with debris. behind me, you can see what's left of a nice chunk of the famed atlantic city boardwalk. it was ripped apart by super storm sandy. tomorrow, the president is expected to join the new jersey governor and tour parts of the state most heavily damaged by the storm. in atlantic city, duarte geraldino, cbs 5. >>> the super storm also left parts of mary
already packing trains and buses to get into the city. we have live team coverage. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec on the left with beefed up patrols for the rowdy fans but first we kick it off with cate caugiran along the parade route with people already staking out seats for the parade. isn't that right? i can see them behind you. >> reporter: you think we wake up early? true giants fans wake up earlier than us. people are already lining up on market street where the parade route will begin so they have been here and ready for it and so has the city. the city has been setting up. you can take a look they have been working nonstop to set up the big stage for our world series champs at the civic center plaza. giants president larry baer, bruce bochy, pablo sandoval will be given speeches. bay area transit groups have been hard at work with all hands on deck. they have been advising fans along with giants pride to be patient today. >> we have all hands on deck. we're not holding anything back. we're going to have every, single train that's available starting at 4 a.m. until the end of servi
it on the strength of their pitching. the giants shut out the tigers for the second straight game and cbs 5's sports director dennis o'donnell is here with highlights and we have highlights tonight. >> the series is beginning to reach historical proportions ann. it really is incredible no team in the history of the world series has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit. tonight the giants have great odds on their side. new park same result for the giants who are a juggernaut right now. scoreless in the 2nd inning, gregory blanco at the base of the wall. that's a triple. hunter pence trots in from third base and the giants have a 1-0 lead. tigers' starter anibal sanchez had a career earned run average against the giants under 2. but brandon crawford drives home blanco for a 2-0 lead as the shoddy tiger defense continues. same score 5th inning, miguel cabrera but ryan vogelsong gets him to tie up -- pop up ending the threat. the giants become the first team since the 1966 orioles to pitch back-to-back shutouts in the world series 2-0 is the final. and we're joined now by vern glenn in detroit and the tige
police say more than a million people turned out for the parade. cbs 5 reporter mike sugerman was in the middle of all that excitement. >> reporter: it was really exciting and, you know, we did this two years ago. we did it again. it's getting old hat? i don't think anybody thought so today. they came from far and wide and came early. >> we have been here since 11 p.m. we parked and we're just here walking around. >> reporter: they were far from alone. san francisco's homeless population skyrocketed overnight. they just wanted to see the champs. what's it like the second time? >> even better, man. i mean, to be able to take this home to the fans again, obviously, we did it in a little different fashion but, you know, we're here once again and it's fun to share with them. >> we're here to thank them. they are part of this club. we believe that. and they helped us do this. they filled the house every night. we want to thank them. >> reporter: it's estimated one million people would show and it looks like they did. >> i found this broom on the side of the road about two months
the law office of the mayor davis. no word -- but a source tells cbs5 he was unhappy with some legal work he had done for his family an online web site that helps home buyers get the inside scoop on potential property may be the leasing information that's considered too private for the public eye. linda yi say some say it's almost predatory. >> real estate agent san na is showing a buyer an oakland home now in foreclosure. but they can now find out about these distressed deals before the bank takes the home. the new feature gives details about the home headed for foreclosure. this homeowner has been served a notice of default. but the home is not yet on the market. >> to have that put in a public place for everyone to see, it's so humiliating and so embarrassing. >> there are pictures of the home and the address. >> this is like anybody your neighbor could see it. your personal financial situationing right all over the places. >> this map shows all the properties available. the blue homes indicate the one the bargain hunter can pounce on. home buyer beth hood isn't sold on that idea. >> t
a stretch of land called the monterey shale. it runs almost down to l.a. and cbs 5's allen martin explains, homeowners don't own what they think they do. >> reporter: it's jay's favorite pass time, quail hunting with his 12-year-old son eric. that's why he bought 1400 acres of land. >> they're a surface owner. >> reporter: but a letter he got has him worried. >> it's our understanding that you are the surface owner of all or a portion of the land included in a parcel in our competitive oil and gas lease sale. >> reporter: it tells him his private land is about to be leased off to an oil company. >> this could result in surface- disturbing activities on your land. if there is oil in, say, the next section over and they need to drill for it, so be it. i just wish they wouldn't attempt to do it around my house. >> reporter: it's actually a common situation. you may own the surface rights to your property, but you may not own what's underneath, the mineral rights. many of those belong to uncle sam. >> we are required to put those up for lease periodically. >> reporter: the blm's rick cooper sa
.5million people in 12 states are still without power tonight. cbs 5 reporter sharon chin has more now. >> reporter: some of the subway lines are rolling again. many people are finding recovery slow. they're out of gas, out of food, and out of patience. tensions flair on the road to new york city. traffic jams and gas lines stretched for miles in a commute of chaos. >> get in front of me. >> reporter: some stations ran out of fuel or power for pumps. triple a says only a third of the stations are open in new jersey and long island. some bridges opened up but police are enforcing a three person car pool to ease congestion. and more lines swell for buses, food and water. >> they're slowly trying to recover. >> reporter: millions of people in 11 states are spending their fourth night in the dark, including seven families in this lower manhattan apartment complex. this couple stranded on the 20th floor is nearly out of food. >> coming up is really a hardship for us. >> that's why we've stayed up here. >> reporter: their lifeline is volunteers who scales the stairs to bring food from two bl
there are two other guys the police would like to catch, as well. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec in san francisco with more. >> reporter: good morning. one suspect down two to go. police in san francisco are hoping that the public will help them once again find the people responsible for torching a muni bus. police trying to identify these two people who set the bus on fire sunday night by throwing things that were on fire into the bus. it was 12:30 a.m. on monday right after the big giants celebration on market and 3rd street. now, this is cell phone video with pictures of the two arson suspects. police hope someone recognizes these two and turns them in. >> we will identify you, arrest you, prosecute you and you're going to pay for it. so don't go there. >> this vandalism suspect was identified this week as 22-year- old gregory tyler graniss. his picture was circulated on social media sites. it was shared 18,000 times. and this is his mugshot. he is facing felony charges of vandalism and injuring or destroying a passenger transit vehicle. people say it was the mob mentality that caused people t
and businesses still without power, down from 8.5 million at the worst. the total cost could hit $50 billion. cbs reporter ines ferre is in new york where the city is beginning to bustle again. >> reporter: new yorkers are trying to regain a sense of normalcy. they are trying to restore power and mass transit. >>> reporter: the storm moved away from the shore but the devastation left behind is obvious. homes devastated or destroyed, boats tossed ashore. >> very difficult day. >> reporter: the national guard spent the day rescuing stranded residents in moonachie and little ferry, new jersey. tidal surge up the hackensack river pushed five feet of water into the two towns in just 45 minutes. >> within a matter of minutes where the basements are completely flooded. we're just waiting for this rescue. >> reporter: president obama will tour the devastation in new jersey today. >> the most important message i have for them is that america is with you. >> reporter: it could take days or weeks to restore power to the 8 million people who lost electricity. >> how are you going to stop water? >> reporter:
dinghy.,,,,,,,, new details about a nanny, >>> you're watching cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> it just makes you rethink everything. >> new details about a nanny accused of murdering two children in her care. the connections of the family to the bay area. >> the family used to live in san francisco. in fact, the dad was flying home from sfo when police say the nanny stabbed his two kids in the bathtub. cbs 5 reporter sharon chin went to their old bay area neighborhood. >> what happened? >> it's terrible. >> reporter: lauren lived next door to the krim family before they moved to new york two years ago. she can't believe two of the three children are gone. >> they were always like in the backyard, or playing around, so i -- i just can't even imagine. >> reporter: marina krim discovered six-year-old lulu and two-year-old leo stabbed to death in the family's bathtub thursday night. the nanny, yoselyn ortega, next to them. she was wheeled away in a stretcher. police say she tried to slit her own wrists and neck. >> terrifying. >> reporter: police escorted marina krim and her r
cbs 5 eyewitness news in high definition. >>> out at second. >> and that is how you win baseball games. tonight, the giants are just one win away from a world title. >> every person has been real friendly. >> giants fans are managing hostile territory. >>> and agencies seem to get funding at will. we investigate the budgeting and lobbying that has california spending more on jail cells than classrooms. >>> we're going to start by telling you you can watch the giants play tomorrow night at civic center plaza. tv's are going up right now in front of city hall. dennis, this is an amazing story. >> well, i think somebody call barack obama because detroit needs another bailout. no team in the history of the world series has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit. the giants have some pretty good odds on their side. new park, same result for the giants who really look like a juggernaut right now. grego blanco puts one at the wall. that is a three-bagger. a 1-0 lead. tigers starter anibal sanchez, but brandon crawford drives it home for a 2-0 lead. same score. fifth inning now. and miguel cabrera,
at the worst. the total cost could be $50 billion. cbs reporter ines ferre is in new york where the recovery is under way. >> reporter: the storm has moved from the shore but devastation is obvious. homes buried or destroyed, boats toss add shore. >> very difficult day. >> reporter: the national guard spent the day rescuing new jersey residents. a tidal surge up the hackensack river pushed water up in a matter of minutes. >> within a matter of minutes the basement was flooded. we are just waiting for the rescue. >> reporter: president obama will tour the devastation in new jersey today. >> the most important message i have for them is that america's with you. >> reporter: it could take days or weeks to restore power to the 8 million people who lost electricity. >> how are you going to stop water? >> reporter: in new york some subway lines and tunnels are still flooded. officials say it could be days before the trains are running again. signs of life are returning not far away from me, the new york stock exchange will be back running this morning. traders say it's important to show the world
and get ready for halloween. let's get the latest from cbs 5's elizabeth wenger on the commute now. elizabeth. >> thanks, guys. it was kind of surprising of the major freeways still looking okay. it's those city streets, mission, market, and all those streets right around the civic center that are still pretty packed as well as mass transit. you saw all those lines standing room only. jammed caltrain and bart trains, as well. so the parade wrapped up hours ago but obviously there's all that confetti to clean up street sweepers out there. i just got off the phone with the police department. they say market and mission are set to reopen any minute now. in the meantime it's van ness and golf picking up the slack so bart says they are on track to set a ridership record. these will be the three busiest stations still including that civic center stage. back to you guys. >> we posted a lot more video of the parade the crowd and all things giants including the memorabilia at cbssf.com. >>> and we will have more of today's amazing parade of champions including the fans who force the a u-tur
for pulling a gun to cut in line. cbs reporter randall pinkston reports that gas is also hard to find on the jersey shore. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds of thousands of people in manhattan. that's good news for elaine and mark. they have been stuck in their 20th floor apartment without elevator service since the storm knocked out power. >> coming up is really a hardship for us. >> that's why we stayed up here. >> reporter: here in new jersey, police began allowing people
. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran joins us with the dramatic rescue operation as that ship went down in the storm. cate. >> reporter: we will talk about that but right now i want to let you know that hundreds of people are being evacuated in the northern new jersey town this a levee broke flooding the area. as you were mentioning off north carolina, this was a dramatic rescue of the hms bounty. one by one coast guard plucked crew from the ocean. the bowny sank when her engine and pumps failed. it was built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. it was used in a number of big budget films. >> it's a sad thing with a ship like that. a sad thing. >> all that work and all the history of that boat just gone, just like that. >> reporter: the bounty's captain is still missing. this were 16 crew on board, 14 were rescued. one person died. this morning, here are pictures out of new jersey that show that extreme damage. this storm is being blamed for flooding, toppled trees on cars, downed power lines and thousands of evacuees forced to seek higher ground. atlantic city became an ex
a bus burning a few nights ago. cbs 5 reporter anne makovec with how social media led them to another vandalism suspectly. suspect and police hope to catch two more. >> reporter: you know with the invention of the cell phone everything is an amateur videographer these days and now police are hoping that the product of that the cell phone video people take will turn the masses into amateur detectives. check out this cell phone video police just released showing an event that happened early monday morning around 12:30 a.m. after the giants won the world series on sunday night. it's in slow motion. you can see guys throwing something burning into the muni bus. windshield is already smashed. this again was taken at 12:30 on monday morning at market and third streets. police say they have already arrested this guy after this picture was taken by the "san francisco chronicle" then widely circulated on social media sites. >> you make the front page of the paper, your goose is cooked. >> reporter: here is that suspect mugshot 22-year-old gregory tyler graniss of san francisco now facing felon
in line. cbs reporter randall pinkston joins us from the jersey shore with problems people are facing. >> reporter: good morning. the number of utility workers from around the country getting their power back online, mass transit coming back online, but there's so many problems, there's so many people who have lost homes, the temperatures are dropping, they don't have electricity, they don't have heat so small wonder that tempers are fraying. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is still left to be done. the nights are especially hard for people without electricity. >> we've been cold some nights. >> dark and cold. >> reporter: con ed says it will have power back on tomorrow for hundreds
house? and that's on face the nation at 8:30 a.m. here on cbs 5. >>> coming up, why schools are always on the chopping block when it comes to the state budget. anales from governor -- ans from the governor. >>> day of answers ahead. what bay area volunteers at this phone bank are encouraging voters to do. >> and we will meet a man who believes changing a mind set can change the future. hear how he changed his own course in life and doing the same for other young people. we will be right back. ,,,,,,,,,,,, through sunday, get sleep train's very best mattresses at the guaranteed lowest price. plus, pay no interest for 3 years on the best brand-name mattress sets. but the best rest event ends sunday at sleep train. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ whether to approve a tax >>> an election day little over a week away, californians will decide whether or not to approve a tax increase favored by governor brown. the governor has been traveling across the state to fight for passage of proposition 30 and this weekend volunteers are working phone banks but recent polls show only 46%
was made early this morning but don't have the total numbers on that. cbs 5. >> not all the celebrations in san francisco turned violent. check out these fans around at&t park. they were peaceful. thousands of fans gather ed to watch the game together on a jumbotron. the crowd went wild as the giants finished the sweep. >> feels good man. two in three years . you know what it is. >> we did it! yeah! >> oh, my god this is amazing. we deserve this win . this is great. go giants! >> everyone's so excited. there were fire works to mark the win. chestnut street in the city was another place the fans gathered. hundreds of people gathered there for peaceful celebrations. >> kids aren't going to school today. just a thought there. the giants are getting ready for a happy flight home after the win over the tigers last night. they were tied up from the 10th. ryan on second. and marco delivering a two out hit. 4-3 lead. and put the big guy surgio on the mound. took care of the tigers 1, 2, 3. they win it 4-3. >> i couldn't be prouder of these guys. to be world champions in two out of the last three
england. >>> there are warnings as far west as chicago. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran joins us with a look at some of the damage and rescue operations. cate. >> reporter: michelle, frank, as this storm continues to move, sandy is destroying things in her path and causing more evacuations along the way. off north carolina this was the dramatic rescue of the hms bounty built in 1960 as a replica of the original 1787 vessel. it was used in a number of films. the bounty sank when her engine filed. her crew was plucked from the ocean. questions are being raised as to why the ship was out to sea at all. >> last week they said a storm was coming and how big it was and you would have thought they would get out of that area. >> reporter: there were six crewmembers on board, 14 rescued. one person died and the ship's captain is still missing. here are pictures out of new jersey that show that extreme damage. atlantic city became an extension of the atlantic ocean. seaweed and ocean debris swirled in the knee deep water covering downtown streets. just this morning a levee broke in the northern part o
, elizabeth cook, cbs 5. >> that's not san francisco. that's not the way we behave. we're better than that. >>> crews are putting the finishing touches on tomorrow's parade for the giants world series title. about a million people are expected to swarm the city for the parade. bart expecting record ridership. cal train, golden gate transit are adding extra services. the key tomorrow, have a little patience. that parade begins at 11:00. it starts at the base of market street and will make its way to civic center. that's where the team will show off its trophy and some players will speak to the crowd. you can watch the parade of champions right here on cbs 5 beginning tomorrow at 11:00. we'll have our reporters out there. me and dennis will be talking it up from the studio. we'll stream is live online. >> 101 jawas? the fox antewookie? it's a block buster deal. what to make of the shocking sale that produced a lot of grim faces today in the world known as lucasfilm. >> obamacare is still the law at least for the next couple of months. for a lot of californians that means a refund from your h
's arms. also, in new york, a man was arrested for pulling a gun when he tried to cut into a gas line. cbs reporter randall pinkston joins us from the jersey shore with the problems people there are facing. >> reporter: that gun pulling stunt puts you on edge em if you are in a gas line like many of us are. you know, every day the public officials hold news conferences to talk about what's being accomplished. a lot is being accomplished. for example, we have utility workers from around the country helping to restore power. but when you have people who have no heat, no power, people standing in gas lines, it's understandable that tempers are fraying. >>> reporter: you didn't have to look hard to find frustrated people. there were long lines to get gas and long lines to get into new york city, as police enforced a three-person per vehicle rule. traffic will only get better when all of the tunnels and subway lines are clear of water. and the pumps are operating 24 hours a day to speed up the process. but one look at this tunnel connecting manhattan and brooklyn shows just how much work is sti
coast by tomorrow morning. we will have the latest on cbs this morning beginning at 4:30 arm on monday. you can see right now they are picking up rein and winds. the full moon tomorrow will be combined with the storm to increase the risk of storm surge from all of this. so, not only will there be winds approaching hurricane strength, but flooding, 6 to 12 inches of rain mikely near the path of this -- likely near the path of this and power gusts of up to 40 miles per hour gusts and beach erosion as well. we will have our forecast in just a few minutes. but first, a earthquake? >>> yes, a massive earthquake from canada send tsunami warnings all the way down to hawaii. >> yes. it was the first to hit the region in more than 06 years. we have a map. the quake struck the queen charlotte islands around 8:00 last night. people could feel the ground shaking up to 500-miles away in vancouver. several after shocks have already followed but no major damage has been reported. the waves did hit maui rougy three hours after the evacun orders were gi and tsunami sirens went off in hawaii follo
.ncicap.org-- [captioning made possible by worldwide pants, inc., and the cbs television network.] ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, didn't deliver on a major selling point. "...bee >>> that's the first i heard about it. >> nearly one million car owners are getting money back, all because their cars didn't deliver on a major selling point. >>> juliette goodrich on the promise that didn't quited a up. >> hi, ken, we're talking about miles per gallon. do you question the fuel economy when you buy a car. well two manufacturers, kia and hundai had to take these stickers off and change them to the right number. on top of that, they've had to reimburse a million car owners. >> reporter: they relied on the honor system when it came to the car's fuel economy. they said it was posted right on the window sticker at the car lot. >> did you hear the mileage might be off? >> that's the first i heard about. >> reporter: there was an error in the testing procedure. the error coverric approximately 41 -- covering approximately 41% of the vehicles sold by the companies since 2010. the companies say they will pay owners back for the fuel
't these? there's some other angle here that we don't know about. >> reporter: grace lee, cbs 5. >> so there is a court hearing scheduled for tuesday, and there is a possibility we could find out who is really behind that $11 million before election day. tomorrow here on eyewitness news this morning, we'll have a conversation with the governor and more on california's budget situation. that broadcast starts at 7:30. >>> this morning, hurricane sandy moving closer to the east coast. it was upgraded back to a hurricane from a tropical storm about 90 minutes ago. the continuing threat is prompting an unusual move from a few airlines. jetblue u.s. a ways and spirit will offering waivers to customers who want to change their flights. that means you wouldn't have to pay a fee. the national weather service is warning of widespread impacts from that storm and susan mcginnis is live from the coast of delaware. good morning, susan. how is it out 24r? >> reporter: ann, good morning. well, 64 million people, that's 1 in 5 americans lie in the path of this storm. folks on the shore of delaware are
, by the way. >> yes. >> it deserves the applause. >> and it was -- i was looking a lot at the history of cbs and nbc, the big two, but abc has started coming on strong and it became the third of the big three. how did abc news did on parity with nbc and cbs? what is the timeframe that that happened? >> abc news to everyone always says it was the fourth that of three. [laughter] for the 60's and 70's. it was a very weak news organization by all accounts. let's be clear. abc does the weakest of the networks as well. if you recall, there were to nbc network and nbc had a spinoff because they had trust concerns. so letter golden sun started building up the entertainment part of abc and to some degree successfully in the 60's and 70's. he concluded the only way to really get to parity with cbs and nbc was to build a great news organization, not so much because he loved news, but because the local stations made most of their money, as they do today, off of their newscast. he needed to improve. so he turned to abc sports, monday night football, while the world's ports and it said, you go over to ne
to cancel the plans. however many have decided to stay and volunteer. >>> we're proud to announce that cbs corporation, our parent company has contributed $1 million to the american red cross. it was also match contributions made by any employees by making an additional contribution. >>> counting down to election day. attitudes toward the death penalty are changing here in calf. a new pole -- in california. a new poll finds that half of california voters prefer to replace the death penalty from life in prison without patrol. that's a shift when many said that life in prison would cost too much. grace lee weighs in. >> this has been surprising for two reasons. number one for six decades calf fornians have supported the death penalty. also at this point in the election cycle most people typically vote no. but what we're seeing here is an increase of yes votes and that's why this has been so surprising. >>> the people in the bay area who count ballots tell us that they have noticed something a little different this election. absentee ballots are not coming in as fast as they did in 2008 and t
. breezy point, my god, that story, i was seeing michelle miller's report on cbs, her second one. it is just amazing what has happened there. we'll get to more on that in just a moment. we're also five days away from a presidential election. and there are some literally logistical issues with that. but bill karins was watching this morning, and you said something that really rang true. three days after a disaster is when the novelty wears off, when it really starts to hurt. bill. >> yeah. i've been going through these the last 15 years of my career, and this is the end of the glow. everyone's all together. it's a novelty. you're getting through it. if you did approval ratings of all the governors in the affected areas, they'd be sky high. this is it. from here, the anger and frustration begins to build from my experience going through these events. once you get to day three and four, all the food in your house is now gone. the gasoline crisis is going to continue. and your generator, if you have one, you can't even get gas for it. it's all of a sudden, it's cold out, too. you hav
: brilliant. the host of the movie and correspondent for cbs sundays morning, mo rocca. >> i think first graders have an uncorrupted sense of fairness. that was real. it's a hot button issue, colored pencils versus markers. >> eliot: and states right did not leap from their lips. >> that did not come up, but we're the only democracy at this point with this system when it was created it wasn't that uncommon but it's well past sell-by date and i'm tired of the two sides of the issues. >> eliot: years ago when states were sovereign, there was respecting the power. it's an idiotic power. i was around electorate once and i felt important. >> us an electorate once. >> eliot: when i was attorney general, governor, you get to hold those positions but fundamentally the electorate college is obsolete. there is an every to undo it. some lawyers came up with to have states pass laws. will that succeed? >> it's halfway there. enough states need to agree to it, that collectively equal 270 votes, the winning number to win the vote. it started with maryland, and if you google" national popular vote plan
these, cbs saying you got to concede, he said i don't think i lost. the polls are wrong again. when have the polls ever mistakenly said the republican has won? really! i am not worried about the exit polls. >> i thought you meant the ten point spread is in our state? >> i don't remember what you're talking about. [talking over each other] >> in light of yesterday's lorillard humans in the supreme court in university of texas, what do you think is the possibility and probability of ending affirmative-action? >> my law firm brought the case against university of michigan undergrad and law school, center for individual rights. we brought the original case ten years ago and won against the law school and undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who said we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have constitutional provisions with expiration dates. there is an interesting book avent tsurprise. liberals try to help how did they cover the failure of public school? affirmative-action. let's deal with the public schools and i suppose i should say, whether or not i always thought was a
, oops, didn't come out that way. in new hampshire, well, i won't run them all of these, but cbs harangued them, saying, you conceived, you lost the election. i don't think i lost. they counted the votes, and he was not losing. when have the polls mistakenly said the republican is winning? [laughter] really, i'm not much worried about the exit polls. >> oh, good, i thought you meant the ten point spread was in our favor, but it's in in the 2008 election was in obama's favor? >> i don't remember that exact column. >> i remember them all. >> better than i do apparently. [laughter] >> ann, in light of yesterday's oral arguments of the supreme court, university of texas case. what do you think is the possibility and probability of ending affirmative action in education? >> well, i hope very good. my law firm brought the case gebs the -- against the university of michigan and law school. we brought that original case ten years ago, won against the law school, lost against undergrads because of sandra day o'connor who says we need 25 more years of affirmative action. now we have consti
states, the latest cbs/"new york times"/quinnipiac poll has the president with a five-point lead in ohio, with virginia and florida much higher but also ever so slightly in the president's favor. a new cnn poll of polls shows mitt romney holding a one-point advantage over the president nationally. >>> the romney campaign hits the reset button today after being idled by superstorm sandy briefly. the republican challenger makes three campaign stops, all in florida, attending rallies at tampa, coral gables and jacksonville. his campaign was buoyed by an endorsement from the telegraph in nashua, new hampshire. the editorial board writes we are confident romney is the candidate who would tackle 9 serious issues facing this nation starting with jobs, the economy and the debt. in the end we couldn't say the same about the president. that paper endorse ed barack oba in 2008. and we're getting late word that mitt romney and paul ryan will kick off a four-day tour starting on friday. they'll be joined by their wimps and some 100 other surrogates will be standing out around the country, condoleezza
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